Archive for the “Restaurant Industry” Category

Q&A with PXUX 2016 Keynote Speaker Chris Laping, Former CIO of Red Robin Gourmet Burgers

ppl before things

Chris Laping will be headlining PXUX (August 24 – 25, Boston) this year, as he speaks to the topic of “Inspiring Crazy Loyalty.” From 2011 to 2015, Chris Laping led business transformation at Red Robin Gourmet Burgers, and was principally accountable for enabling and driving all change and innovation for the brand. His success was highlighted by a collaborative effort with marketing and operations to design and implement a loyalty program.

The Red Robin team acquired 5 million members in the Red Robin loyalty program, a huge success that contributed to the company’s highly-publicized turnaround of an $8 stock price to $89. In this interactive session full of storytelling, Chris will present concepts from his newly released book, People Before Things:  Change Isn’t An End-User Problem—highlighting what it takes to effectively enable and activate people for change and loyalty program success.

We sat down with Chris to learn a bit more about what he’ll be sharing with Paytronix users at the conference this year, and to capture a few highlights of what attendees will learn. […]

Saying “My Pleasure” Instead of “You’re Welcome”

Woman working in restaurant taking payment from customerAfter waiting patiently, you finally order your 8-count of nuggets, small waffle fries, and sweet tea. You pull up to pay at the window, receive your food, and ask for extra Polynesian sauce. Before pulling out of the drive-thru lane, you say, “Thank you,” and the worker responds, “My pleasure.”

For 70 years now, one of America’s most loved fast-food restaurants has been raising the bar on word choice and customer service. Chick-fil-A, “Home of the Original Chicken Sandwich,” has made the phrase “my pleasure” a critical element of customer interactions, favoring it over the more common […]

How to Meet Your Guests’ Customer Service Expectations in 2016

Image of a Customer Service RepresentativeIn an increasingly connected world, customer service tools are being put to the test. Today, we have access to relevant information 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Online experiences are constantly being shaped to fit each user’s specific preferences. We’ve come to expect instant satisfaction and relevancy in every walk of life, and these expectations have carried over to the way your guests feel about your brand.

Today, your guests demand instant satisfaction and relevancy. When they engage with your brand, they want to know they are being heard and remembered. Paytronix recently added two features designed to meet these needs: […]

Geofencing Explained

Every marketer has the goal of compelling their customers to live up to their potential. Whether that is through peer measurement tactics like running a tiered loyalty program, or individual competition tactics like a visit challenge, there are many ways to drive more visits and spend. One element that many marketers fail to consider, however, is geographic potential. What exactly does that mean? Let’s dive in.geofencing w caption_edited-1

Geographic Potential

Geographic potential is the highest frequency with which a customer can visit your restaurant or retail locations based on their proximity to them. Marketers might think they have the geographic information they need about their customers because they ask for an address when a customer registers for their loyalty program. While most customers will probably provide their home address, does that really paint the full picture of their geographic whereabouts? Of course not! If you want to capitalize on the geographic potential of your audience, you need to paint the full picture of where they are spending their time. Say a member of your loyalty program – let’s call him Joe – provides his home address when he signs up for your program. You have a location one mile away from Joe’s address, and you send him lunch offers on a regular basis, but he never redeems them. What gives? It turns out that Joe works 20 miles away from where he lives, so he is never in the area around lunch time. A better use of marketing resources would be to send him dinner offers. […]